Influenced by factors such as history, landscape, climate, and environment, the architectural language of the Cyclades is a harmonious mix of white cubic houses, cobblestone streets, pristine windmills, and ubiquitous blue domed churches.

Cycladic Architecture
Blue-Domed Church in Oia

Simple and conservative, but utterly beautiful and unique, the distinguished Cycladic architecture characterizes the islands that form this lovely Aegean archipelago situated between Athens and Crete. From trendy Mykonos and postcard-perfect Santorini to the Venetian-flavored Naxos and the relaxed, lesser-known islands of Amorgos and Sifnos, each of the Cyclades has its own charm and personality.

Flat roofs, cubic shapes, and dazzling whitewashed walls are dominant features of the local architecture, which glitters in brilliant whites and blues under the glorious Mediterranean sun. Surprisingly, most of these unique settlements have been developed in an unplanned manner using simple materials. Aesthetics have never been a priority for the islands’ inhabitants, the purpose being to cover the people’s needs.

Windmills in Mykonos
Windmills in Mykonos

Cycladic houses are usually orientated to the southeast in order to benefit from natural light, while their walls are painted white and have a thickness of 60-80cm meant to provide protection from the strong winds and extreme heat. On the other hand, some of them (especially in Santorini) are built underground or carved in the hills to protect the interior from direct sunrays and maintain a constant temperature throughout the year.

Nevertheless, most of the islands that comprise the Cyclades offer distinct architectural particularities that reveal the stigma of former occupancies, but also the problems and living necessities of each community.

Paros Island
Paros Island

The clifftop sugar cube villages that dot the majestic caldera of Santorini are a sight to behold, especially at sunset, when the sea, the sky, and the majestic Caldera are bathed in dreamy golden hues. Mykonos stands out for its iconic white windmills and unique Little Venice – a cluster of fishermen’s houses decorated with wooden balconies painted in bright colors. In Naxos and Andros, the typical Cycladic architecture is complemented by beautiful Venetian towers and castles; Sifnos maintains its medieval character; Syros has wonderful neoclassical buildings; and Tinos is famous for its elaborate dovecotes (ornate stone-built structures designed to attract pigeons).

Below, you’ll find a selection of photos depicting various types of Cycladic architecture, including picturesque churches, dazzling pools, awe-inspiring Greek towns, as well as wonderful villas and hotels that combine the straight lines and gentle curves of local design with contemporary aesthetics.

Sunset in Oia
Oia, Santorini
Aenaon Villas
Aenaon Villas
Apollonia, Sifnos
Apollonia, Sifnos
Aris Caves
Aris Caves, Oia
Andronis Boutique Hotel
Andronis Boutique Hotel
Belvedere, Mykonos
Belvedere, Mykonos
Gaia Villa
Gaia Villa, Santorini
Grace Santorini
Grace Santorini
Andronis Luxury Suites
Andronis Luxury Suites, Oia
Canaves Oia
Canaves Oia
Dreams Luxury Suites
Dreams Luxury Suites, Santorini
Infinity pool in Santorini
Chromata Infinity Pool, Santorini
Mitos Suites, Naxos
Mitos Suites, Naxos
Katikies, Oia
Katikies, Oia
Mykonos Cityscape
Houses in Mykonos
Old House in Santorini
Old House in Santorini
Villa Cyrene
Villa Cyrene, Megalochori
Little Venice, Mykonos
Little Venice, Mykonos
Shop in Santorini
Shop in Santorini
Small Architect’s House
The Small Architect’s House, Pyrgos



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